Coconut tomato soup (vegan)

It snowed another foot this week. Which is why I am still making soup practically every week. (Well technically this one is so easy Matt made it!) I seriously considered buying a blow torch to melt the lawn. <<Sigh>>

Back to the soup… it’s creamy” without being creamy and just different enough from the typical tomato soup recipe to pique interest.

I keep the fresh pastes in a tube–ginger and lemongrass in this recipe–in the fridge because they make it fast and easy to bump up flavors in Asian dishes like stir fry or ramen noodle bowls. They last a long time too!

This soup comes together quickly, so very doable for weeknight meals or make ahead to put into school lunches.

Sidenote: Avery’s lunchbox is a bit different than his classmates’. Apparently salads, vegs/hummus and coconut tomato soup are “low trade value” to 17 year old boys. 😉

I am planning the summer herb garden and look forward to just a few weeks from now when I get to plant them…just popping out to the back deck to get a few sprigs of whatever to brighten our meals seems like such a small luxury. Think Spring!!

Coconut Tomato soup (vegan)

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 2 tsp fresh ginger paste
  • 1 tsp fresh lemongrass paste
  • 28oz whole tomatoes
  • 13.5oz can coconut milk
  • 4cups vegetable broth
  • Salt, pepper and sweetener to taste

Sauté onion in olive oil until translucent, about 5 minutes. Add ginger and lemongrass, stir briefly before adding tomatoes and broth. Break tomatoes apart, simmer 20 minutes. Add coconut milk and seasonings. Purée with hand blender.

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Pasta with sausage, chard and ricotta (vegan)

This recipe has become one of Avery’s favorites. He’s even made it himself once! (And learned that when mom says “4 garlic cloves” she means chop them up, not whole 😉).

The sauce uses a classic Italian technique to make for silky and perfectly cooked noodles–using the pasta water to finish the cooking within the sauté pan with the other ingredients. It is practically fool proof.

We use vegan sausage and ricotta for this, which is a nice way to get some plant protein along with the carbs.

Any leafy green works, but rainbow Swiss chard is our favorite because it cooks fast but doesn’t completely fall apart like spinach. You throw it in the pasta pot for the last 2 minutes, which is another cheat making this recipe a weeknight favorite.

There are many variations on this recipe–changeout the protein or green, skip the ricotta or substitute parmesan, use any combination tomatoes–but the base sauce technique is definitely a winner for any experience level. So long as you remember to chop the garlic.

  • Pasta with sausage, chard and ricotta (vegan)
    • 4 cloves garlic chopped
      4 tbsp olive oil, divided
      1 pint or more small tomatoes–we love brown Kumato, red grape and yellow Sunburst, cut in half
      1 lb vegan Italian or Chipotle flavored sausage, sliced
      1 bunch Swiss chard, leaves roughly chopped, stems discarded
      1 lb pasta, tube shape preferably
      1/2 cup or more ricotta (we like Kite Hill brand)
      2 tbsp pine nuts

    Roast the tomatoes for about 20 minutes at 300 degrees until juices start running and they begin to caramelize.

    In the meantime, start pasta water.

    Sauté sausage on both sides in 2 tbsp olive oil until brown. Remove from pan.

    Put pasta in water and cook for 2 minutes less than instructions.

    While pasta cooks, remove tomatoes from oven. Sauté garlic in remaining oil for 1 minute before adding tomatoes. Scoop 1 cup of pasta water into tomato sauce. Let simmer on low.

    Add Swiss chard to pasta with 2 minutes remaining. Drain pasta and add to tomato sauce. The noodles will be al dente, and continue cooking for 2 minutes until tomato sauce finishes cooking noodles. You can always add more pasta water to the mixture. (Don’t dump it out until you finish the sauce just to be safe).

    Add sausage back in. Top with ricotta and pine nuts.

    Beans on toast (vegan)

    Another snow day off of school here in Minnesota. We just broke the snowfall record for February (and mind you we have another week to go!) with over 30″ just this month, including 8″ in the last day. Btw, The last time this happened the Metrodome roof collapsed.

    We’ve had a lot of together time inside and I am really grateful for Amazon Prime to bring groceries to my door!

    This hearty dish is nice for a cold day, and is good on its own, over noodles or toast. Whole Foods even has a pre-made vegan garlic bread to make this super fast and super easy. We like Field Roast brand of “fork nossage” (not pork=fake=fork, not sausage=nossage), in either Italian or Chipotle flavors.

    I am really regretting not booking a winter getaway this year…..am willing to do a house swap if anyone’s interested….ours comes with 2 Cornish Rex cats who love to cuddle.

    Beans on toast

    • 2 tbsp olive oil
    • 1lb vegan Italian sausage, sliced into rounds
    • 5 cloves garlic, chopped
    • 1 tsp oregano
    • 1 tsp crushed red pepper
    • 5 oz package spinach or bunch of chopped Swiss chard leaves (any hearty green really)
    • 2 cans cannellini beans, rinsed
    • 28 oz can crushed tomatoes
    • 1 cup water
    • 1 tsp Salt

    Sauté sausage in olive oil until brown, flipping halfway through. Add garlic, salt, oregano and crushed red pepper. Cook 1 minute before adding tomatoes and water. Simmer 10 minutes. Add spinach and beans and cook another 5 minutes.

    Serve over garlic toast or noodles.

    **Recipe adapted from Bon Appetite

    Healthy holiday eating weeknight Mediterranean (vegan)

    Let’s be honest: This time of year is so hard to eat healthy. The average American gains just over a pound between Thanksgiving and New Year’s, which doesn’t sound like a lot.

    But as I get older (sigh–closer to 50 than 40 this year), it gets harder and harder to maintain let alone lose weight. But more than anything, when I gain weight I really feel it. Even in the magical elastic jeans that stretch. I hate that feeling physically.

    Going Vegan has made that so much easier. I recently learned through my work project that’s in the Type 2 Diabetes space something about new science–calories in, calories out is old thinking. Huh, good to know!

    The new research shows that it’s both easier and more complicated than that…the quality, timing and frequency matter. (Especially for diabetics).

    Every person metabolizes calories differently. Therefore different foods and even eating foods in a specific sequence can make a difference. For anyone watching blood sugars exercise also matters, with something as simple as taking a walk after a meal to help stabilize blood sugar. (**This is when I say that I am not a doctor and not giving medical advice!**)

    So basically I am learning to stop tracking my food–which is a habit built over the last 5 years–and learning to fast (16 hours off and 8 on). I am also watching my reaction to exercise as it relates to meal timing. I feel best when I exercise midstream during my “on” timeframe.

    This fasting process tricks your body into burning fat. It’s working for me slowly and without a ton of effort. It’s not really that difficult since I generally dislike breakfast and black coffee doesn’t count (really).

    During the 8 hours on, I feel good about eating whatever fruits, vegetables, healthy fats, limited healthy whole grains, non-meat protein I want. And it’s also easier to not have to track things in detail but know that I have good meal quality generally by being vegan.

    As always when it comes to food that fuels my body, I try to let go of the good/bad labels that come with “dieting” and in fact don’t see it as a diet but just the way I like to eat because it feels good.

    I also enjoy the creative process of putting a meal together, which can be a challenge in a time starved world. This easy Mediterranean dinner is a good break from heavy holiday foods, and it’s simple to prep ahead for dinner on the table in 5 minutes.

    Wishing you health and balance this holiday season!

    Mediterranean salad

    • 1 English cucumber, skinned and sliced into half rounds
    • 2 tomatoes, seeded and diced
    • Juice of 1 lemon
    • 1 tbsp olive oil
    • Hummus
    • Package tabbouleh
    • 1/2cup chopped parsley
    • 1 can garbanzo beans drained
    • Naan

    Prepare tabbouleh according to package. Add most of parsley and juice of 1/2 lemon. Refrigerate for an hour or more. Drain and rinse beans. Set aside. Seed and dice tomatoes, peel and chop cucumbers, adding remaining juice of 1/2 lemon. Add 1 tbsp olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Allow to marinate preferably overnight. Assemble salad by putting hummus in center, surrounding with tabbouleh, beans, and cucumber/tomato salad. Sprinkle remaining parsley and drizzle with olive oil. Serve with naan.

    Manicotti (vegan)

    I was really hesitant about going full vegan on this recipe for manicotti, which is a winter comfort food for us. Let’s face it, it’s hard to substitute something that has as its main ingredient ooey gooey goodness with “feeze”. (All substitutes in our house now begin with F, as in “fake”. Ficken. Feeb. Feeze. We haven’t figured out what to do with Fish, except to say it wrong: Feesh. This is my first try with Feggs too).

    But gosh darnit, it’s Sunday and I feel like experimenting while listening to the same 12 Christmas carols on the radio. I mean just look at these ingredients, doesn’t that look like the makings of a fantastic Sunday supper?!

    Many thanks to Cathryn’s Kitchen for her recipe inspiration. The main uniqueness of this version is the crepes, which make the entire dish a silky texture, and how I have typically made manicotti. The crepes are a bit tedious to make but open some wine while singing to classic Dean Martin carols and it’ll go fast.

    I was more than pleasantly surprised by the creaminess of the “rinotta” filling that had a nice lightness to it.

    I added some chopped sautéed vegan Italian sausage to about half and would experiment with other additions next time too. I am trying out recipes for our Italian Christmas Eve dinner and now that I have a good substitute for ricotta, a whole new repertoire opened up!

    Feel free of course to use the real deals, but you too might be surprised by the vegan substitutes.

    Manicotti (vegan)

    Crepes

    • 1c flour
    • 2 “eggs”
    • 2/3c water (in addition to the water for the vegan eggs)

    Blend all together and let sit for 30 min.

    Filling

    In the meantime, mix up the filling.

    • 16 oz medium firm tofu
    • 3 tbsp nutritional yeast
    • 2 tbsp tahini
    • 6 oz “mozzarella” cheese
    • 2 oz grated “parmesan”
    • Juice of 1/2 lemon
    • Zest of 1 lemon
    • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
    • Dash cayenne pepper
    • 1/4 cup chopped parsley
    • Salt and pepper
  • Mix ingredients together (and add other fillings as desired, such as vegan sausage).
  • Make the crepes by heating 1 tsp olive oil over low heat. Add 3 tbsp of batter and spread using the back of the ladle. Cook about 1 min and flip to finish another minute or so until the entire crepe takes on a translucent quality.
  • Fill with 3 tbsp of filling and repeat (this made about 18 crepes).
  • I used jar spicy marinara for the sauce, putting just enough to cover the pan before layering crepes on top and covering with remaining sauce. Bake covered for 35 minutes at 350 degrees.
  • Finish with chopped fresh basil.
  • Tomato soup (vegan)

    Potpourri. Growing up that’s what mom called leftover night. I hated potpourri night. So now, beloved readers, I give you a potpourri post. A recipe, yes. But some other random food stuff since it’s been awhile.

    Let’s start with something cool. I am trying out a new Twin Cities startup, Local Crate. It’s a food delivery concept involving ingredients from local farms and artisans. It’s not dissimilar to why I originally started blogging–to inspire people to explore what’s grown near them. It’s been an interesting and time-saving experience to have a couple meals pretty much prepped. I made vegan tikka masala this week!!

    It doesn’t quite look like the picture but it tasted good. This is ideal for people who love to cook but hate planning and shopping.

    In other food news, Alec is discovering how good he had it eating at home. “Why don’t they make spaghetti and meatballs?” The thrill of a cafeteria offering perpetual ice cream sundaes has worn off. He says he’s losing weight especially now that swim season has kicked in. He has 5:30am practice 3x a week. We look forward to feeding him at Thanksgiving!

    Avery has really embraced the vegan diet. He’s even doing a biology research project on how plant protein impacts athlete performance. It’s the first time he’s gotten truly curious about molecular structure 😉

    He’s also learning how to make vegan snacks for late night studying (nachos being a favorite). Yea for adaptability and learning!

    Finally, here’s the recipe. This is so simple it shouldn’t really count, but sometimes simple is good for the soul. It snowed this week. Yes people. Snow. I am perpetually cold and it’s only October.

    Tomato soup

    • 4tbsp olive oil
    • 3 carrots, sliced into halfmoons
    • 3 stalks celery, sliced
    • 1 medium yellow onion, diced
    • 4 cloves garlic minced
    • Celery leaves, fresh oregano and thymes stalks
    • 4c vegetable stock
    • 28oz can whole tomatoes
    • Salt, pepper, basil

    Simmer onion in oil until soft. Add celery, carrots and garlic and sauté another 3-5 minutes until onions are golden. Add tomatoes and vegetable stock. I added a few end pieces of the celery with leaves attached and some fresh oregano and thyme still attached to the stalk. This gave the flavor a bit more depth. Simmer covered for about 30 minutes. Remove the celery leaves and herb stalks (if you used them). Purée until smooth with hand blender, season to taste with salt pepper and basil (1/2 tsp is an estimate).

    Watermelon jalapeño gazpacho

    People either love or hate cold soup. Ya know, the kinds that are supposed to be cold. I happen to love them, with gazpacho being top of the list. Especially right now as the tomatoes are just starting to come in.

    Sidenote: I have 2 perfect green tomatoes growing on my deck. I have invested a lot in these beauties and am protecting them fiercely from critters. Am relishing a perfect slice atop a veggie burger or all on its own. It’s just a few weeks now and they’ll bloom red. Please, Mr. Squirrel, please pass by my perfect tomatoes.

    Anyhow, this soup is nice because it’s not the same old but is both sweet and spicy. A good quality watermelon makes all the difference–seedless is the only way to go.

    Top it off with fruit salsa. Normally I like to use what’s in it so people know, but in this case I had some cantaloupe left to use up and needed a color contrast.

    An easy way to get your fruits and veggies in and low fat too, perfect on a hot summer day. Super easy and super fast!

    Watermelon gazpacho

    • 3cups cubed seeded watermelon
    • 3 tomatoes, seeded and chopped
    • 1/4c red pepper slices
    • 3 inches of a seedless English cucumber, peeled and diced
    • 3 cloves garlic, roughly chopped
    • 3 slices jalapeño (no seeds!)
    • 1/2 small yellow onion, cut in large chunks
    • 1 tsp grated fresh ginger
    • 1 tbsp champagne vinegar (white or red wine or lime juice works too)
    • 1 tbsp mint finely chopped.

    Blend everything but mint together in blender or food processor until smooth. Season with salt and add mint. Top with fruit salsa or a drizzle of olive oil.

    Fruit salsa is simply diced watermelon, cantaloupe, cucumber and finely chopped mint.